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Lea Michele is The New L’Oreal Paris Face!

Faces come and go, but it seems Lea Michele’s is here to stay. The Glee star has recently been signed to be the new face for popular beauty company, L’Oreal Paris. The hit FOX network show, Glee, has been going pretty strong for the past couple of years and Lea Michele has been there the whole way. It seems her face is everywhere; every red carpet event has a fashion police photo of the young starlet – usually in the best dressed category – and it’s hard to go to a gossip page or open up a magazine without seeing Ms. Lea. Now we well be seeing her face a lot more. With her new contract with L’Oreal ads – print and TV – will feature the beautiful, budding star.

Lea couldn’t wait to spread the news. She tweeted, “The rumors are true! So excited to be the new L’Oreal Paris Brand spokesperson!”

Lea Michele told People, “I’m overjoyed and beyond honored to be a part of the L’Oréal Paris family, I’m such a fan of L’Oréal Paris not just for all of their amazing products, but for what they stand for. I’m so thankful to be a part of a television show that promotes inner beauty and self-worth. Now to be a part of this amazing family that expresses the same amazing message is such an honor.”

Following that enthusiastic statement, the president of L’Oreal Paris USA, Karen T. Fondu made one of her own; “A beautiful woman inside and out, Lea truly exemplifies our brand philosophy, ‘Because You’re Worth It.’ We are so honored to welcome her as a member of the family.”

It seems everyone is simply ecstatic about this new deal between L’Oreal and Lea – and for good reason. In the past, other overjoyed faces (who are still worth it) include, Beyonce, Jennifer Lopez and Eva Longoria. All of whom are now more successful, whether it’s in their personal life (babies!) or on screen; L’Oreal seemed to help push their fame value. With that being said, we wish Lea good luck and can’t wait to see those commercials in 2013!

 

YSL & Louboutin, Friends In The End?

Victory has been claimed…by both parties? The long running suit between two fashion greats has finally come to a conclusion, but not quite an end. Judge Cabranes (the 2nd judge on the case) ruled, “The contrast between the sole and the upper that causes the sole to ‘pop’ and to distinguish its creator [Louboutin].”The judge, Cabranes, which has taken over the case, has ruled in favor or both companies. He has agreed that YSL can only produce and distribute shoes with red soled bottoms if the whole shoe is red, and Louboutin gets to keep his trademark of having a red soled bottom when the rest of the shoe is of a different color, allowing him to keep that “pop.” It is that “pop” that distinguishes him from other designers, such as YSL. Louboutin’s lawyer, Harley Lewin said, “The brand is tremendously pleased, [allowing Louboutin] to protect a life’s work as the same is embodied in the red sole found on his women’s luxury shoes.”

The first judge to take the case didn’t understand or really agree with Louboutin being granted a copyright/trademark in 2008 for his red soles. This new judge understood that factor – these infamous red soles carry a huge dynamic in fashion, street style, and luxury – and in fact Louboutin’s lawyers did some digging and found that a judge did indeed grant a company full trademark rights over a certain color green. This finding really helped Louboutin’s case, and potentially a case that could ensue for Tiffany & Co. – Thankfully, Tiffany & Co. should have nothing to worry about. Louboutin’s original suit was based on this: “Defendants’ use of red footwear outsoles that are virtually identical to plaintiffs’ Red Sole Mark is likely to cause and is causing confusion, mistake and deception among the relevant purchasing public.” The second judge agreed with Louboutin here; this is why some may say he ruled in Louboutin’s favor. However, looking at things from YSl’s standpoint; they were being sued over their use of red soles on red shoes. That judge did in fact rule that YSL can use red soles only on red shoes. Therefore, both parties have accomplished their goal. YSL’s lawyer, H. Bernstein of Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, presented this statement:”The Court has conclusively ruled that YSL’s monochromatic red shoes do not infringe any trademark rights of Louboutin, which guarantees that YSL can continue to make monochromatic shoes in a wide variety of colors, including red. YSL will continue to produce monochromatic shoes with red outsoles, as it has done since the 1970s.”

I have a feeling this is not the last we will hear from Louboutin on this subject. But, major fashion law headway has been made!

 

Equality on a New Level

Fashion is ever changing. Each season, there is a new trend or fad for the masses to follow. A trend that has not necessarily been set by a designer, but has been making way for over 50 years, has reached that point where we all start to stop, stare, and well, notice. Coincidentally, this trend has been right under our noses the whole time…ok, maybe right above…but either way eyebrows that are currently in trend are those of thicker, less arched varieties. Have you noticed, stars such as Emma Watson and Jennifer Connelly have been trimming their brows to this not-so-new trend.

Calling all Mrs. Twizzermen, put the tweezers down and stop plucking. With this news hitting the blogosphere, many girls are coming forward about their habits of over plucking. Read some of these blogs, these girls are tormenting themselves with an obsession to tweeze and pluck. Many of these bloggers are talking about new ways to keep them tame, but to not go overboard.

Many say that this trend in fashion has come from the whole androgynous thing. Men dressing like women, women dressing like men, do we want to look the same or be treated the same. Reported by the Huffington Post, spokesman, Mark Soldin, for the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons, told the Independent; “Upward curvature of the eyebrows was considered to be an attractive feminine feature in the past. We are finding that more and more women are looking for a flatter, straighter, more masculine look. I think it has to do with the increasing equality of the sexes. Women are subconsciously favouring a masculine brow.”

What do you think? Are we trying to be more masculine?

Back to you over tweezers, some women are even resorting to hair transplant surgery to fill in those spots that they plucked too many times. I say, use a little self restraint and try alternatives like eyebrow threading.

CR Fashion Book Hits Newsstands This Week

If you’re looking for a fresh fashion fix at your nearest trendy newsstand, than you won’t have to wait much longer. Thursday (September 13th) Carine Roitfeld’s brand new glossy will land on magazine racks around the country and judging from the sneak peeks the new mag is offering, it’s going to be filled with plenty of things we haven’t seen before.

Roitfeld, who spent over a decade as Editor and Chief at French Vogue announced back in 2010 that she would be leaving the storied fashion mag to bring her very own vision of what a glossy should be to life. While it has been quiet some time in the making it seems like CR Fashion Book, Issue 1: Rebirth will be well worth the wait. The magazine’s theme is carried throughout with images of babies, young animals and a gorgeous cover spread of Kate Upton posing with new born ducklings that was shot by the ever entertaining Bruce Weber. It also features a unique layout with 90% of the mag focusing on fashion spreads and the remaining ten being either articles or stories. The short “front of book” blog like articles that readers are used to finding in a fashion mag have been moved over the CR Fashion Book’s website to help make room for the central spreads and advertising from a veritable who’s who of the industry.

Other features include a short story by designer Tom Ford, a shoot from Channel creative director Karl Lagerfeld and an essay by actress Anne Hathaway. Adding to the magazine’s unique layout is the fact that all advertisements will be arranged in alphabetical order, making it easier for the reader to find their favorite labels. In an interview with New York Times columnist Eric Wilson, Roitfeld explained some of the inspiration behind the new mag saying: “When I was at Vogue, I had a lot of freedom. But I was still in a beautiful golden cage. I could not do a campaign with Karl Lagerfeld or launch a line with MAC. I want to do all these propositions. I think its fun. This magazine is a project to do between all the other crazy projects I have. I want to enjoy it, you know?”

If you want to get a head start enjoying this intriguing new glossy check out CR Fashion Book’s website here.

Old Navy Settles Lawsuit with Kim Kardashian

Back in July 2011 Promgirl News reported on an interesting lawsuit filed by the queen of reality TV herself, Kim K, against mass market clothing retailer Old Navy. The suit alleged that Old Navy’s “Super C.U.T.E.” ad campaign, featuring a model and singer named Melissa Molinaro was going to violate Kardashian’s publicity rights by causing “confusion in the marketplace” due to Molinaro’s resemblance to Kardashian and the fact that the content of the ad hinted at Molinaro enjoying serious celebrity status. While legal observers questioned just how much of an impact the case’s ruling would have on the idea of a celebrity as a brand, it appears now that both Kardashian and Old Navy were none too interested in finding out as news broke today that a settlement was reached.

According to a joint statement released earlier today “The lawsuit was resolved to mutual satisfaction of both parties.” No further information on the monetary amount of the settlement have been made available at this time, but the LA Times is reporting that lawyers involved with the case were originally talking about amounts in the neighborhood of $15 to $20 million. It has also been suggested by multiple news outlets that Kardashian had sought to prevent Old Navy from ever using another look alike, though no one has confirmed whether any such language appears in the settlement.

For now it seems that those interested in finding the legal line between persona and brand for celebrities in the 21 century will have to wait for the next alleged publicity rights violation. In the meantime Kim K’s bank account just got a little bigger, though considering Old Navy’s parent company Gap Inc. has seen their fortune steadily improving over the last fiscal year perhaps they don’t mind too much.

Lavin Gets Real

Tziporh Salamon for Lanvin, Winter 2012

Many an aspiring young model living in New York City or L.A. has fantasized about a casting agent walking up to them on the street and informing them that they are perfect for the latest high fashion ad campaign. However for 62-year old former schoolteacher Tizporah Salamon that fantasy hadn’t been on her mind for decades when she was approached by casting agent Zan Ludlum who wanted her for Lanvin’s Winter 2012 ad campaign. Salamon is one of eleven new faces for Lavin’s latest campaign cast entirely without professional models.

The brainchild of Lanvin creative director Alber Elbaz, the campaign, shot by veteran photographer Steven Meisel seeks to bring a breath of fresh air to the world of high fashion advertisements. As Mr. Elbaz explained:

“Fashion doesn’t look good only on models, it can look good on different people of different ages and different body shapes. We didn’t think there would be such a big talk because we just did it and we thought let’s try to work with real people. Let’s do street casting, let’s work with different men and women of different ages and see what comes out of it.”

Despite Elbaz’s nonchalant attitude towards the decision the campaign has turned plenty of heads both in the fashion world and mainstream media for its daring and unique look. Many have already stated, and here at Promgirl News we are inclined to agree with them, that this is one of the most visually pleasing high fashion ad campaigns in a while. Though that comes as no surprise Zan Ludlum who told reporters:

“It’s beyond visual. Sure, they might have great eyes or features but it’s more about their presence, their ownership of their own individuality. You might see someone who has style, but if you strip away everything, are they still powerful? Because we are taking them out of who they are and putting them in new clothes. Are they interesting beyond what they’re wearing.”

Perhaps the most refreshing part of this campaign is how the civilians turned models are handling their time in the spotlight. Salamon herself was giddy with excitement when asked about her experience as a fashion model, saying “I felt like such a princess, a queen for a day, I was high as a kite.”

Stella McCartney Talks Designing Olympic Uniforms

With the opening ceremony for the 2012 summer Olympics just a few days away everyone is gearing up to cheer on their country’s athletes as they compete on the biggest stage  in the world. However in the world of fashion a number of designers

A few of the Olympic uniforms McCartney designed for Great Britain showing their unique take on the Union Jack.

have been hearing nothing but boos when it comes to the uniforms they’ve supplied for their nations. Here at home Ralph Lauren is taking some heat for the fact that his uniforms for the U.S. Olympic team were made in China, but Ralph is getting off light compared to the criticism being leveled at British designer Stella McCartney. If you thought people get mad about changing brand names you should see what happens when you change the color scheme of your country’s flag!

At the heart of the criticism of McCartney’s designs is the fact that she choose to remove the red from the beloved Union Jack (Great Britain’s flag) and use it instead as an accent color on the uniforms. Though it should also be noted that Stella McCartney is the only designer who is responsible not only for designing the athletes ceremonial garb, but the actual gear they will be competing in. A fact that we hear at Promgirl News think should give her some added leeway, but then again we never pledged allegiance to the Union Jack in high school.

In what seems like a move intended to smooth some ruffled British feathers McCartney gave an interview to Financial Times in which she discussed the many challenges she encountered and the substantial effort she put into designing Great Britain’s athletic gear. According to the Times interview McCartney spent two and a half years working on the designs and when the time came for high performance gear the designer went right to the source. By working with the athletes themselves to develop uniforms McCartney was able to put functionality at the forefront of her designs, as she explains:

“Designing for athletes – enabling them to perform at their highest level – was a level of pressure I’ve never felt. You don’t ever want someone to say, ‘My clothes didn’t function perfectly.’ But at the same time, function has two meanings: they have to work at the performance level but they also have to work to make someone feel good psychologically. And then you have a whole country that has their own thoughts about what looks good.”

As far as how negative some of those thoughts were regarding the uniform design McCartney apparently took the negativity in stride saying “It’s not my usual audience.”

Xena Warrior Princess Inspires in US Army’s Quest to Design Female Body Armor

Xena, pictured in one of her unique suits of armor.

The 21st century is full of opportunities for women that their mothers and grandmothers never had, but in many ways it is still a man’s world and to the thousands of young women serving in the United States military one of the first steps to changing that is combat gear designed with the female body in mind. An article published at the beginning of this week by The Christian Science Monitor highlighted an issue with protective body armor that many female military personal feel needs to be resolved immediately, as well as one rather unexpected sources of inspiration for a solution.

Of course it goes without saying that fashion doesn’t merit a lot of concern in a war zone, and when it comes to rocking the “purely utilitarian” look your average soldier’s uniform is about as utility oriented as it gets, but the problem facing many female service members is that their armor does not properly fulfill its role simply because it was never designed for them. The issue really came to the foreground for the US military back in 2009 when a number of women serving with the Army’s 101st Airborne Division, a highly decorated unit with a history of being in the thick of the fighting since World War II,  began to complain about their ill-fitting body armor. The protective armor that is issued to soldiers in combat zones can be custom selected based on one of eleven sizes, however all the sizes were originally designed for men.

“It rubbed on the hips, and the vests were too long in the front, so that when you had female soldiers climbing stairs or climbing up a hill or a tree, or sitting for a long time in a vehicle, that would create pressure points that in some instances could impact blood flow and cause some discomfort,” says Lt. Col. Frank Lozano, part of the Army team currently working to develop better female body armor. Col. Lozano’s comments echo the concerns of a recently released report by the Army that notes the ill-fitting body armor is more than just a matter of discomfort because it can affect a female soldier’s ability to aim her weapon or enter and exit a vehicle rapidly, both of which would diminish combat effectiveness and put her in further danger.

Some proposed solutions for the new body armor include bra-shaped darting built into the chest plate and narrower shoulders. The problem is that unlike haute couture body armor’s design is heavily influenced by its purpose: stopping a bullet! And Army designers point out that the more curves you put into the design the more weak points you create. But perhaps most fascinating part of this whole story is the inspiration of one of their proposed solutions, using armor plates shaped in such a way that they would spread out the impact of a bullet. Their inspirational model? The armor worn by Lucy Lawless’s 90’s TV persona “Xena: Warrior Princess”.

CFDA, Neiman Marcus and Target Team Up for Epic Designer Collaboration

Saturday December 1st 2012 is a date you are going to want to mark on your calendar now if you’re a fan of mass market designer collaborations because it will signal the release, both in stores and on the web, of the most expansive designer collaboration ever attempted. As any hardcore fashionista can already tell you, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Council of Fashion Designers of America and the CFDA is celebrating in a big way, with a gift collaboration through Neiman Marcus and Target that will involve 24 CFDA designers collaborating on 50 gifts.

Each designer will contribute between one and three items and the designs they will be putting forward look like they will have something for everyone, from men’s, women’s and children’s apparel and accessories to home decor, sporting goods, electronic accessories and even pet accessories. The items in the collection will also run a wide range of prices with the least expensive starting at a mere $7.99 and the most valuable items retailing for $499.99, however Target has gone to great lengths to assure its customers that the majority of the items will be under $60.

“This collaboration is unlike anything Target has done before,” Gregg Steinhafel, chairman, president and CEO of Target said in a recent press release. Mr. Steinhafel even went so far as say that the two major chains have “set the stage for a redefining moment in retail.” With a line up of designers that reads like some kind of fashion all-star team (Marc Jacobs, Prabal Gurung, Proenza Schouler, Oscar de la Renta and Tory Burch to name a few) Mr. Steinhafel has reason to be optimistic about the potential of this collab. The strange partnership that looks to marry Neiman Marcus prestige with Target mass production should prove fascinating even to those who don’t normally go in for the whole designer collaboration fad.

One thing is for sure: If your thinking of adding some CFDA 50th anniversary designs to Christmas wish list you want to make sure that your schedule is free on December 1st. For a full list of designers check out the collaboration’s first official advertisement here.

 

 

Seventeen Responds to Online Petition with Photoshop Pledge

In response to a petition started by one of its readers the August issue of Seventeen will contain an eight-point Body Peace Treaty authored by Seventeen’s editor-in-chief Ann Shoket that vows to never use Photoshop to “change a girl’s body or face shapes” and “always feature geal girls and models who are healthy”. The Treaty is in response to an online petition at Change.org that was started back in April by 14-year-old Julia Bluhm. The Maine teenager decided to take a stand against magazines showing “impossibly thin” models with “perfect skin”, after she became upset at how often her friends and peers negatively discussed their bodies in comparison to models featured in magazines.

In the three months since the petition was posted Julia amassed nearly 100,000 signatures from other young women who shared her desire to see magazines feature women whose bodies were unaltered by Photoshop. After increased pressure from the news media and the public at large Seventeen’s editor-in-chief responded with a letter that introduced the Body Peace Treaty. In the letter editor-in-chief Ann Shoket writes:

“Recently I’ve heard from some girls who were concerned that we’d strayed from our promise to show real girls as they really are. A lot of the comments were about Photoshopping or digitally enhancing photos. Readers wondered if we had gone too far. Like all magazines, we retouch images — removing wrinkles in fabric, stray hairs, a few zits, random bra straps — but we never alter the way the girls on our pages really look. It’s crucial that we represent girls of all shapes, sizes, and skin tones for their real beauty. Our Body Peace Project is one of the cornerstones of our mission: We want every girl to stop obsessing about what her body looks like and start appreciating it for what it can do! While we work hard behind the scenes to make sure we’re being authentic, your notes made me realize that it was time for us to be more public about our commitment.”

Since the announcement of this letter Bluhm has posted the following response on Change.org:

Seventeen listened! They’re saying they won’t use photoshop to digitally alter their models! This is a huge victory, and I’m so unbelievably happy. Another petition is being started by SPARK activists Emma and Carina, targeting Teen Vogue and I will sign it. If we can be heard by one magazine, we can do it with another. We are sparking a change!”

Clearly Ms. Bluhm and her compatriots are treating this victory as a step forward in the battle to help promote realistic body images for young women everywhere. To read the full editor’s letter or view the Body Peace Treaty check out the images Seventeen supplied to styleite.com.